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So Archbang hates me guys

Discussion in 'Installing Linux' started by Aremis, Sep 4, 2014.

  1. Aremis

    Aremis Member

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    So a while ago I was looking at arch os's, right? I want to use something that is a little less used because all I hear on debian is UBUNTU UBUNTU UBUNTU. Jeez........

    So, ARCHBANG?!! COOL! I KNOW HOW TO USE THAT INSTALLER BECAUSE FLAT DEBIAN USES IT :DDDD

    So I can't install it.

    It refuses to say "Hey, that's a viable partition that isn't windows"

    If you have read my other posts you will see all I want is linux. Can't do that for visual studi and can't find any of my stupid disks for a VBOX so that'll have to wait.

    Anyways anyone have an idea. I have a post on the arch forums too.
  2. Daerandin

    Daerandin Active Member

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    You should not post on the Arch forums regarding Archbang as it is a separate distribution that does things its own way. Any post on Arch forums regarding Archbang is going to get locked and moved to the dustbin as it is against forum rules there.

    Archbang got their own forums and is a much better place to ask support as the people there know Archbang and can help.

    I have never tried it so I am unfamiliar with the process. If the issue is just partitioning, then you could simply use another partitioning tool to set up partitions first. Personally I used the CLI tool cgdisk to partition my drives, and it is what I still use when I repartition USB's or other hard drives. But you could also use gparted live cd/usb to get the partitioning done.
  3. Aremis

    Aremis Member

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    I decided to just do arch and hate myself for a few hours until I got it to work. It's exhilarating. A new frontier! Like the French! Or something I dunnobuwhutvr.

    Anyways, yes. I will need help installing it or I will just do archbang.

    Also the forums have been removed from the archbang site.
  4. Marlhin

    Marlhin Member

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    In the German Archwiki there's a very good step-by-step installation guide which also explains in detail what exactly this command is used for. Unfortunately there isn't such a nice guide in the English wiki but there's also an installation guide with which you will hopefully successful install Arch.

    I am also using Arch because it is the only distro which fits perfectly in my behaviour and my thinking about what a linux distro should look like.
    <-- former (X)Ubuntu user
  5. Daerandin

    Daerandin Active Member

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    The English Archwiki got the beginner's guide, which is quite detailed in explaining all the steps. It is a long read, but it is what I followed and what I would still choose to read if I were to install Arch again on another computer.

    Beginner's guide

    Familiarizing yourself with the wiki more or less mandatory when using Arch. Remember that Arch provides vanilla upstream packages, they do not modify or patch (unless severe breakage requires it) software. Everything comes exactly as provided by upstream sources.

    Also, if you have any specific questions or anything you wonder about, I would not mind helping out.
  6. Aremis

    Aremis Member

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    I have actually gotten normal arch installed. I want to build it from the ground up. I have a desktop for gaming and stuff so I don't really need my laptop. My main thing right now is setting up networking, then getting openbox or e17, and xorg (duh), then do wireless, then go from there.
  7. Daerandin

    Daerandin Active Member

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    Glad you got it installed without issues. Once again, the wiki got articles on most topics and usually offer several ways to get something done.

    I would really recommend reading the wiki page about Pacman to know some of the most important things. In particular the section about how Partial upgrades are unsupported. Arch is most easily maintained if you update your system once per week (or more often, I tend to do daily updates), and always pay attention to the output when you update your system. Pacman is not designed to automatically configure stuff and only gives warnings in case something should be taken care of after an update.

    Another page that might help you avoid some headaches is the Pacnew and Pacsave page on the wiki. I managed to break my very first Arch install because I had not read about this, and had not paid attention to the output when doing updates for a while. When I then started attempting to handle these .pacnew files, let's just say I did not do it correctly and ended up with an unusable system. However, I was a complete Linux newbie at that time, so it was only expected that I broke my Arch install after only a couple of weeks.

    Checking the wiki for anything you plan to install is always a wise move. Remember that Arch uses much newer versions of software than most other distros. For example, Arch use xorg-server 1.16 which is by default runs rootless unlike all previous versions of X. Everything it not perfectly ironed out in this version, you can't redirect stderr and I display managers don't work with rootless X and as such you must configure it to run in the old way for display managers.

    Lastly, reading the front page news on the Arch website is also something you should generally do before updates. I don't always do that, but I make sure to always check the news if the an update does something unusual, or I see output that I've not seen before.

    Hope this can be helpful to get you off to a wonderful relationship with Arch.
  8. Aremis

    Aremis Member

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    I already love it. The fact that I'm setting it up to do what I want it to is too exciting to me.

    I got networking working yesterday and that made my day. My next goals are Xorg, Sound, and Openbox. Only issue is I don't know how to install drivers for xorg so that'll be an issue.

    Thanks for that tip on pacsaves and stuff. I'l have to read up on that later today.
  9. Daerandin

    Daerandin Active Member

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    Arch comes with Alsa, and if that's all you want to use then the wiki page provides lot of info. Pulseaudio is of course also available and the wiki page is very handy there.

    Arch have most X drivers available in the official repositories, except for proprietary drivers for AMD cards. Those drivers proved to be way too problematic to maintain packages of since they always depend on older versions, so they were dropped from official Arch repos. I know there is an unofficial repo available (info in the wiki) which includes older versions of software so that things should work.

    But all open source drivers are available in the repos, as well as nvidia proprietary drivers. Another good stop in the wiki is the General recommendations page which provide a good list of stuff you might want to install, or how to configure some common things. Using Arch might be a bit slow at first, since a lot of reading is involved, but once you get the hang of it and become familiar with your system, then a lot of things will come naturally.
  10. Aremis

    Aremis Member

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    I've gotten the hang of it all. Apparently my wireless card profile for my network at home is broken or something, or I forgot a package. I'm not really sure what to do about it to be honest. I'm going to dig on thew arch forums though.

    If you can help that would be great.

    I boot up the machine and the first thing I do is turn on wireless and get that shit up.

    So ok.

    I do su, get that going, then ip link set wlp3s0 up, then wifi-menu, but when I choose my home network I get this.

    Code:
    Job for netctl@wlp3s0\x2dHOME\x2d49B2.service  failed.  See 'systemctl status netctl@wlp3s0\x2dHOME\x2d49B2.service' and 'journalctl -xn' for details.
    Naturally I look up the error right? Card amnagement isn't done perfectly and I need to maybe install something else to work with n etctl, but someone else said delete the profile. I know from slackware you DO NOT RANDOMLY DELETE ANYTHING.

    No clue what to do though.
  11. Aremis

    Aremis Member

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    Oop, found the issue. Again. You know it seems like as soon as something breaks here it is just as easy to pull back, slap it around a bit, then have it act nicely.

    Something wasn't configured correctly on install with wpa_supplicant and I am just going to look at packages that can manage that for me.
  12. Daerandin

    Daerandin Active Member

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    What is the output you get from the suggested commands? Does it say something about the interface already being up?

    I don't use wifi-menu so I don't have much experience with it. But a lot of networking tools require the interface to be down, so that it is guaranteed that no other service is using it.

    Also, wireless networking require the package wpa_supplicant to be installed, otherwise it can't connect to secure wireless networks. It is in the official repos, it is just not installed with the base system. The base install really is very minimal and pretty much only have the most basic tools required to actually have the system running.

    Personally I use netctl to handle network as it integrates nicely with systemd, and provides ready config files that are easy to edit to the network you want to connect to.

    And remember, make sure you disable on networking agent or service if you intend to use another. Otherwise the one you first set up is going to prevent any other services from using the network interface.

    Edit: Noticed that you posted while I was typing this :p

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